40th Releases - Design Meanings and Style - 2016 Summer
 

Unconquered

Artist: Kathleen Moody

On a literal level, "Unconquered" depicts a magnificent white stallion - radiant and shimmering, mane and tail flying in the wind, a symbol of power, strength and renewal - rising Phoenix-like from the rubble of the fallen World Trade Center that was attacked by terrorists on September 11, 2001. But this only tells half the story, for there is a deeper meaning behind this stunning sculpture. “Unconquered" also stands as an inspiring and patriotic representation of the triumphant response to adversity that defines the indomitable American Spirit

 


Home Sweet Home

Artist: Kathleen Moody
 
The Clydesdale is a popular breed that originated in mid-18th Century Scotland, and was historically used to haul carts and carriages. It is known as a “gentle giant” for its large size and easygoing temperament.

 

 

American Beauty

Artist: Karlynn Keyes
 
Along with floral floats and marching bands, Parade Horses magnificently attired in elaborate western-style tack - brightly decorated breast collars, silver-studded saddles with long tapaderos on the stirrups.


 


Keeper of Dreams

Artist: Courtney Moore
 
Inspired by the Native American belief that Dream Catchers collect both good and bad dreams - the bad dreams get caught in the web and are burned off by the morning sun, while good dreams get filtered into the feathers

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Wrecking Bull

Artist: Karlynn Keyes

The hottest celebrities on the Rodeo Circuit today are the professional bull riders - those rough and tumble cowboys who strive for an eight second ride on the back of a leaping, spinning, 2,000 pound beast that is all muscle and meanness. As anyone who has seen a bull riding event knows, it is a thrilling, dangerous, action-packed sport whose spirit and appeal is perfectly captured in "Wrecking Bull.".

 

Navajo Chief

Artist: Karlynn Keyes

Distinguished by diamond patterns, indigo blue stripes, and dyed red yarns, Navajo Chief blankets are the most recognizable and valuable of all Navajo weavings. Prized and traded for by wealthy and powerful members of Plains. Tribes long before the white man set foot on the land that became known as America, they were especially valued as saddle blankets, where they communicated the tribal status and rank of the rider.

 

Ribbons of Love

Artist: Susan Sizemore
The artist had the name "horse lover" in mind when she created a design that featured a pink horse wrapped in free-flowing ribbons that hold red and gold hearts, and frame the portrait of a magnificent silver stallion.

 

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