51st & 52nd Releases - Design Meanings and Style - 2020
 

Canyon Beauty

Artist: Cheryl A. Harris

"Canyon Beauty" is an artistic celebration of the Native Tribes that inhabited and passed through the brilliantly colored, otherworldly formations of Indian Country in the Southwest. From towering buff-colored cliffs rising out of the canyons of Canyon de Chelly, to the gleaming domes of Utah's Capitol Reef, to the natural sandstone arches of red rock country, these one-of-a-kind landscapes were an artistic inspiration for the Hopi, Navajo, Zuni and Ute tribes.


 


Night Ranger

Artist: Iana Moczar

There's nothing quite like exploring the world on its oldest form of transportation. Wilderness landscapes, wide-open prairies, sagebrush hillsides, mountain meadows and river valleys are best experienced on horseback. It's a perspective that was enjoyed by those who rode across the American West when it was trackless backcountry. "Night Ranger" is an artistic nod to the moonlight rides under a star-roofed night sky that were a familiar part of a cowboy's life.

The stars on "Night Ranger" glow in the dark.



 


Voodoo

Artist: Kathleen Moody

Competition between stallions for mares on the wild horse range of the Sand Wash Basin can be brutal, and the battle between Picasso, a gorgeous pinto featured in The Trail's Summer 2019 release, and Voodoo, a single stallion that had lost his band, for the attention of a young filly, led to continual fighting. By early summer Voodoo had prevailed, but his victory was short-lived. On August 21, 2018 he was found with a broken leg and humanely euthanized. True story. In his memory, and in acknowledgement of the rivalry between these two spirited stallions, The Trail has created this companion piece to "Dance of the Mustang."

See my VIDEO of both Voodoo and Dance of the Mustang.


 

Sea Stallion

Artist:

 

Pony on Parade

Artist: Julie Karnath

Parade horses have a rich and colorful history. They are all about flash, flair and eye-catching style, which is why they are as big a crowd-pleaser as marching bands and floats. “Pony on Parade” - elaborately decorated with a beautifully hand-crafted western saddle and bridle, with brightly colored ribbons added to the mane and tail, and moving proudly in a high-prancing “parade gait,” - is The Trail of Painted Ponies’ entry into this honorable tradition.

52nd Release - Design Meanings and Style - 2020

Forever Young

Artist: Kathleen Moody

Developed during the Middle Ages as a war horse because of its height and speed and ability to carry knights in full armor on their backs, the Friesian almost faced extinction by the end of World War II, before it was crossbred with other selected types of horses to produce animals suitable not only for sport disciplines but carriage driving. With its heavy stature, noble head set on a high arched neck, long and flowing mane and tail, and willing temperament, a crossbred Friesian mare with its young foal running beside her is a vision of the past as well as the future.

 

Mystic Dreamer

Artist: Emily Overman

Over the course of time, different animals have taken on a dimension of magical symbolism. Think eagle and bear. But the horse, in particular, occupies an esteemed place in the folklore and legends of cultures around the world. In search of fresh ways of capturing the magical energy of horses and incorporating it into an original design, this Artist created “Mystic Dreamer.” With a coat the color of moonlight, and adorned with crystals, beads, and totems, “Mystic Dreamer” was conceived as a guide on the journey to new beginnings for those who chase their dreams.

 

El Vaquero

Artist: Janet Snyder

Decked out in sombreros and serapes, the Vaqueros were the working cowboys of Mexico’s missions and ranches in the American Southwest. Skilled at all aspects of ranch work, they made and threw lariats, herded and branded cattle, and were excellent horsemen who trained their mounts to respond to the slightest cues. Indeed, the design of their saddles - styled so they could ride every day, all day long, and still keep their horse’s backs healthy - influenced the style of the western saddles of today… which is why ballads were written and sung about Vaqueros.

 

 

Pride of the Nez Perce

Artist: Kristen Reiter

Through selective breeding, the Nez Perce Native American tribe is widely credited with creating the Appaloosa horse. The Appaloosa is known extensively for its uniquely spotted coat, but the Nez Perce were also careful to breed for endurance, courage, intelligence and a quiet nature. To them, the Appaloosa was not simply a beast of burden, but a member of the family - and it still is to this day. “Pride of the Nez Perce” is a celebration of this special relationship, and an offering of gratitude to the tribe for the gift they have provided in creating the magnificent Appaloosa.

 

 

Ride over to the other Painted Ponies |